This article is going to be a bit different than other articles so just bear with me.

Example one: You have a friend, but you only have a few days a week, and a couple hours in those days, you can visit with your friend. You and your friend talk and decide on fun things you both enjoy.  During your time together you laugh and have fun. Sometimes you fight but most of the time you and your friend have a great time.

Example two: You have a friend, but you only have a few days a week, and a couple hours in those days, you can visit with your friend. Your friend shows up and tells you that he/she and you are going to go do something you are scared to do. When you tell your friend that you are scared to do that and ask to talk about it first he/she slaps you and tells you to quit complaining. Then next time your friend comes over he/she tells you that the two of you are going to go do a very physically challenging activity. You are excited and go with your friend but soon realize it is a bit harder then you at first thought. You get tired but every time you ask your friend for a break he/she hits you and makes you keep going. The next time you are with your friend the two of you are just hanging out eating lunch and suddenly he/she slaps you and starts yelling at you. You don’t know why your friend is treating you this way and soon become depressed sometimes fighting back which only serves to anger your friend more.

Right about now you are probably saying who would ever be friends with someone like that? Stay with me.

Mirror example one: You have a horse, but you only have a few days a week, and a couple hours in those days, you can be with your horse. You find out what your horse likes to do and what you enjoy doing with your horse. You spend your limited amount of time enjoying your horse and working toward bettering both yourself and your horse in an enjoyable manner. During your time together you laugh at your horse and your horse shows through body language that he/she is having as much fun as you. Sometimes you fight with your horse and have trouble but most of the time you and your horse have a great time improving in understanding.

Mirror example two: You have a horse, but you only have a few days a week, and a couple hours in those days, you can be with your horse. You show up and head out to the pasture. You clip a lead on and without a second thought take your horse to the barn. On the way there you have to cross a shallow puddle that appeared in night thanks to a rain storm the previous day. Your horse spooks. You get frustrated over the insignificance of the puddle and hit your horse to get them over it, all the while grumbling ‘dumb horse’ to yourself. A little later you head out to ride. Your horse is quite energetic and ready to go. You have them lounge for a while until they are less excited then you get on. Your horse moves forward calmly focused.  You are so happy. Then after a while your horse starts getting lazy. You grumble. Your trainer tells you to kick them and pop them with the crop to get them to ‘move their lazy rear’. You do just that. After your ride you rinse your horse off then let them graze a bit. Your horse happily tares up the grass enjoying to relaxation. You are ready to head home so you pull on the rope a few times but your horse keeps stopping to eat. You call your horse stubborn and hit them soundly with the end of the lead rope causing them to jump forward in shock and quit eating. Now it seems like every time you come out to ride your horse ‘acts up’ or maybe ‘is stubborn’. You get more and more frustrated until you finally sell you horse and get a ‘good’ horse.

The answer to the above question, our horses more often than not is our most longsuffering friends. They often live in a world of complete confusion caused by the way we treat them. We act like anything that goes wrong is our horses fault, they are ‘lazy’, ‘stubborn’, ‘flighty’, ‘nervous’, ‘bad’, etc. Ask our horses’ friends and leaders we are supposed to treat them kindly and help them understand. If we are truly leading then we should take deeply to heart the rule of leadership that states, “Everything right or wrong is a direct reflection upon the quality of the leader not the action of the follower.”  If you want a ‘good’ horse you need only open your eyes and become the leader and friend you should be.

What type of friend will you be to your horse? Will you be a good leader?